In the past, I knew Tutsy as a celebrated author of video art created using the virtual platform of Second Life®.

Today, visiting his performance in LEA16, I discover that he is also an excellent 2D artist.

His gallery is one of the exhibitions hosted by Itakos project.

In the bottom of the article, I leave references for the landing point, so who want to visit the other galleries, can do so without difficulty.

Now I wish, with great pleasure, go into “Venal Muses,” the exhibition of Tutsy Navarathna.

If you want to understand the meaning of his artistic presentation, it is essential you read the text that the author puts the observer’s attention right away.

Tutsy shows the visitor the great interest that famous painters in the time had to the “venal muses,” charming women, forced to live in severe conditions. They lived in the men’s allegiance, but they could, despite everything, to live, to find a role in the world and to give meaning to their existence.

By visiting the official website regarding artistic activities hosted by LEAs sim, I found this presentation:

Tutsy Navarathna, a multifaceted artist, is an installation inspired by the works of great painters of the past. Poets, painters, writers, and musicians were all inspired by the atmosphere of brothels and their venal muses. Some, like Toulouse Lautrec, have even made it the essential part of Their Work. Painters like Degas, Manet, Derain, Munch, Rouault, Van Dongen, Vlaminck, to name a few of the most Celebrated, portray virtue of little ladies lounging on a sofa in the rooms of Their lupanar. Pablo Picasso, the founder of Cubism, was caught in the spotlight: his work “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” (The Young Ladies of Avignon, originally titled The Brothel of Avignon) is in e2ect Considered one of the major works of contemporary creation.They created a new pictorial language, the provocative compositions, the caricature style and garish colors. Diverting the classical nude, the two different pictorial movements each use this subject Allowing them to “rebellion” as Charles Baudelaire calls it, Which AIMS not only to criticize Their society but Also the condition of treatment of These girls, women above all, to revolutionize the codes of representation, and even create new ones. This exhibition wants to be a virtual tribute to the masterpieces of great painters of That period.

Visiting the exhibition of Tutsy, I immediately thought it was fascinating the idea of creating the brothel environment within the gallery. Building very well-made, built by Yoon, known, among other things, for her blog (which is one of my favorites and I recommend you read).

Tutsy develops the theme of “Venal Muses” through photography in Second Life® which is subsequently processed to look like a vintage frame.

I like the predominant colors, yellow and red, the first to light up, the second to excite.

To ensure that you wholeheartedly endorse every room of the gallery, I suggest you follow the red arrows: they, in fact, allow to guide the visitor through the various exhibition levels and also visit the “secret room.”

At the point of arrival is a gift for all guests.

Speaking of poetry, I remember the significant words by Charles Baudelaire:

La Muse vénale

Ô muse de mon coeur, amante des palais,
Auras-tu, quand Janvier lâchera ses Borées,
Durant les noirs ennuis des neigeuses soirées,
Un tison pour chauffer tes deux pieds violets?

Ranimeras-tu donc tes épaules marbrées
Aux nocturnes rayons qui percent les volets?
Sentant ta bourse à sec autant que ton palais
Récolteras-tu l’or des voûtes azurées?

II te faut, pour gagner ton pain de chaque soir,
Comme un enfant de choeur, jouer de l’encensoir,
Chanter des Te Deum auxquels tu ne crois guère,

Ou, saltimbanque à jeun, étaler tes appas
Et ton rire trempé de pleurs qu’on ne voit pas,
Pour faire épanouir la rate du vulgaire.

— Charles Baudelaire

Machinima

Details

WhereItakos Art Gallery, owned by Akim Alonzo

Title“Venal Muses”

ArtistTutsy Navarathna

Itakos Gallery: Landing Point

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